Investment in the Business – Part 2 – Other Categories for Investors

Investment in the Business – Part 2 – Other Categories for Investors

There are other categories which can be facilitative for investments to the wine industry.  For example, for Americans and Mexicans, there is the Investor Category under NAFTA, which has the advantage of not having any fixed investment guidelines.  If an applicant is short of what is required under the provincial nomination program, or is not interested perhaps in long-term immigration prospects, NAFTA investors may be for them.

Ultimately, if the investment is only passive and the prospective investor does not want any immigration status, they can be treated effectively as visitors but whose principal purpose is to visit the company that they have invested in, or the enterprise they have invested in.  There is no reason why this could not apply to wineries or other enterprises within the wine industry in British Columbia.

The test for visitors to be allowed to Canada, generally speaking, is that they show they have sufficient ties to their home country and satisfy the Canadian officials either at a Canadian Consulate abroad (if you are a citizen of a country that needs a visa), or at a port of entry (if you are from a visa exempt country) to ensure that you will return to you home country at the end of your visit.

Proof of ties to that home country – such things as property ownership, bank statements, utility bills, etc. are often sufficient proof to most prospective visitors.  One has to be careful when an investment has been made in the province, as often the officials at the Canada Border Services Agency are inherently suspicious that every visitor investing in Canada wants to stay here permanently.